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25 June 2020 18:30

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19:30

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Stories to Inspire: Robert Falcon Scott - The First British Explorer to Reach the South Pole

A renowned Story-teller and adventurer in his own right, Rob Caskie takes us into the race for the pole, expanding upon the decision-making process and its influence on Scott's expeditions. It is an intriguing story.

Was Robert Falcon Scott destined to race for the South Pole, or pressed to do so by the Royal Geographical Society and British public? His first attempt off the Discovery in 1901/4 was a disaster. The pressure mounted when Shackleton got 97 miles from the Pole in January 1909.

A combination of failures and unusual decisions conspired to doom Scott’s party, and found his supremely hardy party of 5 stumble upon the South Pole on 17th January 1912. Some authors suggest his men died psychologically in the moment they realised they had been beaten by Amundsen’s party. Could they make the 880 miles / 1,400 km back to the hut at Cape Evans?

This is a spellbinding story. Amundsen himself admitted he could never have man-hauled a sled to the Pole and back. Scott was destined to become a greater hero, tragically, dead.



Program

Time Description
18:30

Login and Access Meeting

This evening presentation will take place online via a 'Zoom' meeting (a widely used webcast meeting provider). We will provide further information, including an access link and password, to all attendees in advance of the event.
18:35

Welcome and Presentation Rob Caskie

Rob Caskie takes us into the race for the pole, expanding upon the decision-making process and its influence on Scott's expeditions. It is an intriguing story.
19:20

Questions and Close

19:30

End

Speakers

  • Rob Caskie

    Who would ever have conceived that sharing stories about solo motorcycle journeys in Africa would have led to a career as storyteller? With a varied background, Rob have always believed that human beings have an innate desire to hear stories, and more particularly stories about human beings, rather than events.

    Telling stories for a living began for Rob in 2001, on the famous Anglo-Zulu War battlefields at the foot of world renowned raconteur, David Rattray. Researching and sharing human dramas has taken me to the Antarctic on numerous occasions, the Arctic, annually to the UK and very regularly to the Battlefields.

    One may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows what they may do because of it. That is the role of a storyteller.

    That privilege and responsibility drives Rob daily to hone his skill, research new stories, and share the fantastic lessons which emerge from these stories of Life. He choose stories from his repertoire for clients depending on their theme or what their objective is. I

    With stick and trademark shorts, Rob prides himself on positive, unique storytelling and does not rely on electronic or visual aids ‘when the lights trip, Rob does not’.